he Foundation prioritizes eight issues for funding and responds to timely issues or special projects outside the funding priorities. We encourage requests for core operating support, but requests for project funding are also welcome. Core operating support can be used to help underwrite the regular, ongoing health promotion and disease prevention activities of your organization. Such funds can also be used to strengthen organizational infrastructure through activities such as providing salaries for key administrative staff, covering operating expenses, engaging in strategic planning or facilitating board development. Each issue is described below.

Diversity in the Health Professions

Grants that address the issue of diversity in the health professions are commonly given to organizations that provide pipeline programs, scholarships, mentoring programs, internships and fellowships that support and advance career opportunities for people of color in the health professions, including allied health and public health professions. Organizations that support people of color in the health professions through strategic partnerships, leadership development, continuing education and networking activities are also eligible for funding. In addition, the Foundation funds organizations that educate policymakers about public and institutional policies that promote diversity in the health professions.

Environmental Health

Grants that address the issue of environmental health are commonly given to organizations that provide environmental health education and awareness activities, community organizing to promote environmental health, screening and testing for environmental health exposure, leadership development, and partnerships between public health departments and community-based health programs to improve environmental health. The Foundation also funds efforts to inform policymakers and advocate for policies that could improve environmental health among underserved populations. No letters of interest in this area will be accepted until April 1, 2004.

Healthy Aging

Grants that address the issue of healthy aging are commonly given to organizations that provide clinical preventive services, leadership development, recreation programs, food and nutrition services, consumer education, adult immunizations, family caregiving and chronic disease management. Also funded are organizations that support relationships between youth and older adults through activities such as intergenerational volunteering and mentoring. In addition, the Foundation funds agencies that educate policymakers about issues such as prescription drugs, family caregiving, employment, elder abuse and appropriate and affordable housing for the elderly.

Mental Health

Grants that address the issue of mental health are commonly given to organizations that provide primary and secondary prevention services for older teens transitioning to adulthood, with a focus on those in foster care, the juvenile justice system and runaway/homeless youth. Services for other underserved populations, such as homeless adults and immigrants, are funded as well. In addition, the Foundation funds organizations that provide leadership development programs for mental health professionals, increase public awareness of mental health issues and advocate for policies that promote mental health.

Teenage Pregnancy Prevention

Grants that address the issue of teenage pregnancy prevention are commonly given to organizations that provide outreach activities for reproductive health care, comprehensive sexuality education, access to contraception, education and counseling about contraception, comprehensive programs for pregnant teens, peer counseling programs and male involvement programs. An emphasis is placed on funding organizations that work with high-risk, sexually active, underserved teen populations. The Foundation also provides grants to organizations that provide leadership development activities for reproductive health care workers and to organizations that inform policymakers and opinion leaders about effective policies and programs to prevent teen pregnancy. At this time, no letters of interest addressing this issue will be accepted. For future updates, please visit our website at www.tcwf.org.

Violence Prevention

Grants that address the issue of violence prevention are commonly made to organizations that provide mentoring programs for youth, community-based conflict resolution programs, peer mediation, afterschool programs, school-based violence prevention programs and domestic violence prevention among vulnerable groups. Grants are also made to organizations that provide leadership development activities to strengthen the field of violence prevention. In addition, the Foundation funds organizations that inform policymakers and advocate for public policies that increase resources for programs that prevent violence against youth and that reduce injury and death by firearms.

Women’s Health

Grants that address the issue of women’s health are commonly given to organizations that provide clinical services, screenings, prenatal care, mobile health care, self-help groups, community health education and related services. Priority is given to organizations that create welcoming environments for women and girls in underserved communities. The Foundation also funds organizations that involve women in leadership development, policy advocacy and community mobilization around women’s health issues.

Work and Health

Grants that address the issue of work and health are commonly given to organizations that increase workers’ access to preventive health care, help prevent workplace injuries and illnesses and provide worksite health promotion programs. Organizations that provide technology training to help low-income youth obtain employment and its corresponding health benefits are also funded. In addition, the Foundation funds organizations that provide leadership development programs focused on the health of workers. Organizations that educate policymakers about the connections between work and health and promote policies that would improve the health of low-income workers are funded as well. No letters of interest in this area will be accepted until April 1, 2004.

Special Projects

Each year, the Foundation sets aside a pool of dollars to respond in a timely fashion to opportunities that fit our mission but are outside the eight funding priorities. Of particular interest are proposals to help California communities deal effectively with the health impact of the shift of federal responsibilities for health and human services to state and local levels. The Foundation has made grants to support and strengthen safety net providers of preventive care, to help low-income consumers understand and navigate changes in the health care system, and to inform public decision making through policy analysis and advocacy.

Application Process

To present The California Wellness Foundation with a grant request, an organization should first write a one- to two-page letter of interest that describes the organization’s mission and activities, the region and population(s) served, how the funds will be used and the total funds requested from the Foundation. If requesting project funding, please include project goals, leadership and duration. Your letter will be processed most accurately if you clearly designate the TCWF health issue funding priority through which you want your request considered. No application form is needed, and formal proposals are not accepted at this preliminary stage.

Foundation staff will review letters of interest on an ongoing basis and notify prospective applicants of the results normally within three to four months. Those encouraged to submit a proposal will receive further guidance at that time.

Eligibility Criteria

With rare exception, the Foundation funds nonprofit organizations that are exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code and are deemed as “not a private foundation” under Section 509(a). The Foundation also funds government agencies. Grants are not generally awarded for annual fund drives, building campaigns, major equipment or biomedical research. Activities that exclusively benefit the members of sectarian or religious organizations are not considered. We do not provide international funding or fund organizations that are located outside the United States.

Letters of interest should be directed to: Director of Grants Management, The California Wellness Foundation, 6320 Canoga Avenue, Suite 1700, Woodland Hills, CA 91367


Winter 2004

Creative Strategies Help Overcome Barriers To Accessing Health Care Services

Local data improves
advocacy efforts

Mentors help young women achieve goals and delay parenthood

Help for victims of domestic violence

In The News

How To Apply

Grants Listing

What’s New

Credits

 
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